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Transcription – Mike Beeney Show 204

Mike:               What is important to get the best return on investment, is those operations that do the best with introducing wearables do it when they integrate it to their strategy, they introduce it to their classes, to their programing, to their rewards points. So equally, it’s not a set and forget. It is something that you want to get maximum benefit from, and that’s why there are deployment plans and playbooks that will help you step through how you go through that process, to bring something like Myzone into your club successfully.

Chantal:          Welcome to Episode 206 of the industry’s leading business podcast for fitness owners and managers. Each week we invite business experts, coaches, authors, and owners from all across the world to share their expert advice with you, the FBP family. This week’s episode is brought to you by our podcast partner, Myzone. Myzone is the wearable technology that enhances paid programing and drives customer engagement. To find out more, go to Myzone.org.

Welcome, everyone, to a very special episode of the Fitness Business Podcast. Do you ever get the feeling that technology is moving and developing so fast that it’s sometimes hard to keep up? Well, as the host of this show, I’m lucky enough to hear all about the latest news and developments that are happening within our industry, and let me tell you this, if you are not yet taking advantage of the tech that is available to us today, then make sure you listen to this episode and get started straight away.

Longtime listeners of the show will know that Myzone have been an important part of the FBP family for a number of years now, and for anyone that doesn’t already know, Myzone is a wearable technology company and they work with over 6,000 facilities across 65 countries. I recently had the chance to catch up with the Director of Myzone Asia-Pacific, Mike Beeney. Mike holds a master’s degree in exercise and health sciences, and he’s worked in the health and fitness sector for over 20 years, both in the UK and across the Asia-Pacific region.

During this episode, I chatted to Mike about how far wearable tech has come over the last five years. He explains where we’re at today and where we’re headed in the future. We also discussed the advantages for club owners to introduce wearables into a club, Mike explains the concept of gamification, and exactly what it means in relation to member retention. I loved chatting to Mike about this topic, and I think that you’re really going to get a lot out of today’s episode. So without further ado, enjoy my interview with Mike Beeney from Myzone.

I am here right now, at FitEx New Zealand 2018, and I have a very special guest joining me today, Mike Beeney from Myzone. Mike, welcome. Thanks for joining me today.

Mike:               Hi, Chantal. Good to see you again.

Chantal:          It is quite unusual that I get to sit next to my guest, and just to set the scene for everyone, and I’ll take a photo of this for you guys, we are literally sitting in a huge kind of … what do you call this? A theatre, effectively.

Mike:               A lecture theatre here.

Chantal:          I think we’ve kind of got the entire space to ourselves, so we’ve taken it over as our recording studio for today. So, Mike, I’m really excited to have you on the show because we’re going to be talking about wearable technology, we’re going to have a little bit of a look at where we are now, where we’ve been, and where the industry is going. So to start things off today, do you want to describe to us the current fitness wearable landscape?

Mike:               Yeah, sure. I guess on a global perspective, we’re seeing a real variation in terms of the adoption of wearables. Obviously the more mature fitness markets, being Europe and the US and Australia, we’re really starting to see that integration between the wearables that consumers are using into the club basis. But equally, on the other side, areas like Asia, some of the emerging fitness markets, there’s still such great opportunity, but it’s still really, really early days.

Chantal:          Still early days for them. Just so that we have a really thorough understanding, where would you say the industry’s actually come from over the last five years, to where we are today?

Mike:               I think what we have to remember is really the wearable tech industry, arguably, is probably only kind of eight years old. It wasn’t that long ago before, those using wearables had to come back from their run and plug their device back into their computer using a wire, if you remember those things, to upload their workout. So the evolution of things like the smart watches, moving from the counting steps, the 10,000 steps, which became, of course, infamous, has then really evolved through to the smart watches, to the apps, and some really niche areas, actually outside of fitness. Particularly in the medical field, there’s a whole range of development in terms of how wearables can integrate, not only in the fitness element, but also provide some really interesting biometric information and medical, which I think is going to merge with our fitness data, as well.

Chantal:          Well, that pretty much leads us perfectly into my next question, because I’ve heard, as well, a lot about where wearables and medicine, and wearables and fit are progressing to. From your perspective, what do you think that next, let’s say, two to five years looks like, when it comes to wearables?

Mike:               I think a lot of it, you know, the sensors now, in terms of the technology, can really track anything. A lot of those come really from either the medical or the high performance sports field. So really, we can track anything we want to measure. It’s more about finding therefore what is the relevant thing, depending on the kind of activity that you’re doing.

I think secondly, the whole wearable … individual consumer wearable market and integration to fitness, in terms of what we’re doing in clubs, is the other really exciting growth area. So seeing the merge of those two things, but also some really niche devices that are coming out now, based on specifically … There’s a device now, if you’re boxing, that goes into a glove, to be able to tell you the speed and power of your punches and how fast, so we’re also seeing some real niche wearables coming out that are very specific to certain kinds of activity.

Chantal:          We’ve obviously touched on the past and the present and the future of wearable tech, but one of the areas that I wanted to explore with you was specifically how club owners integrate this type of technology. So from your perspective, what would you say some of the biggest advantages are for a club owner to actually introduce wearable tech into their club?

Mike:               Yeah, well, with the continued growth, particularly as more and more millennials start coming in and training at our clubs, this is only going to continue to grow. If we look at the business we’re in, really, is motivation. We all know, in every club, whatever product we offer, however good the trainers are, there are members that don’t make it, because they don’t maintain that motivation enough or until they start to see the results. The whole wearable concept is really built around gamification and motivating. So as a club operator, by being able to build on some of those principles and using the tapping into that power of wearables, then of course you can drive retention, you can drive member engagement. So, yeah, there’s a number of different return on investment models if you can tap into that.

Chantal:          You know, I always feel that sometimes as fitness professionals, when you’re in the shoes of being an owner or a manager or a personal trainer, because we love exercise, sometimes it’s easy to forget that not everyone loves exercise in the way that we do, so there is a need to have that extra element to actually help motivate people, and to entice people to come back and to train more, and to train more often, and to train for longer. That’s exactly what we’re talking about. This is exactly what those wearables can do. So I always feel like one of the best ways to truly to understand any type of product or technology or service is through case studies. Are there any case studies, or is there any research or statistics that you can share with us, perhaps from Myzone, on the effects that wearables have on, say, member retention?

Mike:               Yes, there’s a number of ways that you can look at the impact of wearables on member behaviour. So again, they’re all about behaviour change. So, of course, the holy grail really is retention, so there are a number of quite big studies that have looked at that. One particular study, one of the larger ones, was the Village group, a chain of gyms in the UK. They looked at … shared the data of over 8,000 members. They specifically looked and compared the members that are using Myzone and those that are not using Myzone, and they showed a fairly significant 30% difference in the average length of stay, so it proved that there was a markable difference between those that were and were not using wearables. That figure’s actually been fairly consistent across a whole number of different operators across different sizes, so it shows the impact that it can have on the bottom line in terms of retention.

Chantal:          That’s a massive impact. You know, you mentioned just earlier the word gamification, and I don’t want to gloss over this, because I think it’s such an important factor, and one that, yes, I know a lot of people understand, but at the same time, I think that it’s important that everyone understands the term gamification, so can you explain exactly what that word means? What does gamification mean in relation to wearables, specifically?

Mike:               Sure. Gamification as a concept applies things like points and levels, and basically turns anything into a game. I like the quote I heard once, that gamification is exciting because it promises to make the hard stuff in life fun. As you mentioned before, we forget, I think, that for a lot of members, exercise actually isn’t that fun. It’s still a chore. It’s something they know they should do, they come along and they do their workout, so if we can make that a fun exercise, to make it habitual, that they want to come back and do it again, and that’s really what gamification does.

So the idea is you track what you do, so you get points or you get levels, and of course, once you’re in a game, there’s always the next level that you want to aspire to. The idea as an operator is then to be able to recognise and reward that, so in the same way that frequent flier programmes, where you can aspire to get to the next level and there’s a whole range of other benefits, and of course you then aspire to keep going, and the game never ends.

Chantal:          Are there any examples that you could share with us on how a fitness facility has used gamification to actually increase their member adherence?

Mike:               You can actually apply gamification in a whole number of different ways. It can be as simple as, during a class, using live feedback in terms of points, just to see how you’re competing against someone else. So some of the operators that integrate the live feedback into their workout, Coaching Zone is a good example that use that kind of programme, so you’ve got that short term gamification of who’s going to get the most points in the workout, but then in the longer term, things like challenges, of course, we know that challenge is a really powerful aspect of gamification, and having that live leader board.

Chantal:          So anyone that doesn’t know Coaching Zone, can you just explain that to us?

Mike:               Yeah, so Coaching Zone is a brand from Belgravia Health and Leisure Group, so they’re box in a box boutiques, but some of them are then Genesis clubs and others now are standalone, so they looked to create this kind of boutique model and they wanted to create a unique experience. What they’ve done is therefore develop programing, all based on the live heart rate and using that during the actual sessions. So it means that it has the big screen and that’s motivational, and the coaches can really use that to engage the members during those sessions.

Chantal:          Mike, I’m not sure if you caught the interview that I did with Lauren Foundos recently, from Forte, and for anyone that hasn’t yet listened to that interview, Forte is a business that provides live class streaming to club owners, and I was asking her the question about what her thoughts were on the integration between live class streaming, virtual classes, and wearable tech, and from her perspective, she was saying it’s still an area that they’re working on. Do you have any thoughts on that topic, or any experience in that area?

Mike:               Yeah, so integration, obviously a really key aspect for any technology. So within our own platform, we have our own virtual classes with the wearable integration, but also we do it with other partners. Something fairly recent, that we haven’t yet announced, is that Fitness on Demand have now integrated the Myzone system, which allows you to run the Fitness on Demand system with heart rate showing on the screen. So integration, bringing different technologies together, is going to be a key, moving forward. That’s one of a few partnerships that I think will be really exciting.

Chantal:          That’s amazing. I’m going to assume that most people know Fitness on Demand, but for anyone that doesn’t, they provide virtual classes. So what I’m imagining right now is a screen in a studio, with, say, the instructor is on the screen doing a strength based training class, for example, and what you’re saying is there will be an overlay of Myzone coloured tiles that sits on top of that.

Mike:               Yes, exactly right. Yeah, so previously they’ve been often operated as separate systems with some operators, and it just integrates the fact that they, once they have hardware, they can then deliver the same solution. The driver for us integrating our own virtual class platform was that operators are really interested in this whole growth in technology and virtual was certainly one of those places. So in speaking to operators, looking at heart rate and looking at virtual, that was the driver for us, to say, well, actually we can provide that integrated solution so you have your Myzone virtual and the heart rate showing, and it provides that two-way feedback, which I think is the one thing, as a layer on top of a virtual class that you watch, to have your own heart rate live feed coming through the same screen really gives you more of an interactive environment than just watching a video. I think it adds a whole new element.

Chantal:          Incredible motivation. So, Mike, we’ve covered quite a bit of ground here today, talking about wearable tech. Are there any final takeaways that you would leave everyone with today?

Mike:               I guess the first thing for operators looking at adopting wearable technology, and obviously we talk to a lot of them, I think one of the concerns is just to reassure people they don’t need to be a techie. We talk to operators who say, “I’m not really very good with this stuff.” The whole idea of technology is to try and simplify the process, so you don’t have to be a techie to be able to adopt technology into your club.

That said, what is important to get the best return in investment, is those operators that do the best with introducing wearables do it when they integrate it to their strategy, they introduce it their classes, to their programing, to their rewards points. So equally, it’s not a set and forget. It is something that you want to get maximum benefit from, and that’s why there are deployment plans and playbooks that will help you step through how you go through that process, to bring something like Myzone into your club successfully.

Chantal:          That is great. Well, look, thank you so much for joining us today in a rather unusual setting. But, no, I really do appreciate getting those insights from you and having a look at the history of wearables and where they’re headed to. I always feel, whenever I talk about this topic or anything that is virtual or live class streaming, I’m excited for where the industry is going, because it feels as though we are still … It’s still only early days, and every single week, and every single month, there’s some new development or new progress within the industry of where we’re headed to. So thank you for taking the time to chat to me today, Mike.

Mike:               That’s great. Thanks, Chantal.

Chantal:          Thank you again to Mike for such a detailed and informative interview today. A reminder that Myzone is a wearable technology platform that leverages personal goal setting, gamification, and social platforms to motivate your members. Now, for more information, you can do two things; head directly to Myzone.org, plus there is a great video that I really encourage you to check out, that is located at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com on our partners page. I chat to the President of Myzone, Emmett Williams, and he gives you a great overview all about Myzone. And here’s a little hint; if you want your very own Myzone belt, then I suggest you watch the video right to the end.

Before we finish off today, a reminder that all the resources, the links, and a transcript for today’s show can be found at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com. Thank you so much to our foundation partner, Active Management. If there’s a hole in your lead bucket, you’d fix it. Our founding partner, Active Management, will help you plug the hole in your online lead generating channel with a free download at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com/active.

Thank you all for joining me for another week of the show. I will see you next week, and remember, what you leave behind is not what’s engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.

 

Mike:               What is important to get the best return on investment, is those operations that do the best with introducing wearables do it when they integrate it to their strategy, they introduce it to their classes, to their programing, to their rewards points. So equally, it’s not a set and forget. It is something that you want to get maximum benefit from, and that’s why there are deployment plans and playbooks that will help you step through how you go through that process, to bring something like Myzone into your club successfully.

Chantal:          Welcome to Episode 206 of the industry’s leading business podcast for fitness owners and managers. Each week we invite business experts, coaches, authors, and owners from all across the world to share their expert advice with you, the FBP family. This week’s episode is brought to you by our podcast partner, Myzone. Myzone is the wearable technology that enhances paid programing and drives customer engagement. To find out more, go to Myzone.org.

Welcome, everyone, to a very special episode of the Fitness Business Podcast. Do you ever get the feeling that technology is moving and developing so fast that it’s sometimes hard to keep up? Well, as the host of this show, I’m lucky enough to hear all about the latest news and developments that are happening within our industry, and let me tell you this, if you are not yet taking advantage of the tech that is available to us today, then make sure you listen to this episode and get started straight away.

Longtime listeners of the show will know that Myzone have been an important part of the FBP family for a number of years now, and for anyone that doesn’t already know, Myzone is a wearable technology company and they work with over 6,000 facilities across 65 countries. I recently had the chance to catch up with the Director of Myzone Asia-Pacific, Mike Beeney. Mike holds a master’s degree in exercise and health sciences, and he’s worked in the health and fitness sector for over 20 years, both in the UK and across the Asia-Pacific region.

During this episode, I chatted to Mike about how far wearable tech has come over the last five years. He explains where we’re at today and where we’re headed in the future. We also discussed the advantages for club owners to introduce wearables into a club, Mike explains the concept of gamification, and exactly what it means in relation to member retention. I loved chatting to Mike about this topic, and I think that you’re really going to get a lot out of today’s episode. So without further ado, enjoy my interview with Mike Beeney from Myzone.

I am here right now, at FitEx New Zealand 2018, and I have a very special guest joining me today, Mike Beeney from Myzone. Mike, welcome. Thanks for joining me today.

Mike:               Hi, Chantal. Good to see you again.

Chantal:          It is quite unusual that I get to sit next to my guest, and just to set the scene for everyone, and I’ll take a photo of this for you guys, we are literally sitting in a huge kind of … what do you call this? A theatre, effectively.

Mike:               A lecture theatre here.

Chantal:          I think we’ve kind of got the entire space to ourselves, so we’ve taken it over as our recording studio for today. So, Mike, I’m really excited to have you on the show because we’re going to be talking about wearable technology, we’re going to have a little bit of a look at where we are now, where we’ve been, and where the industry is going. So to start things off today, do you want to describe to us the current fitness wearable landscape?

Mike:               Yeah, sure. I guess on a global perspective, we’re seeing a real variation in terms of the adoption of wearables. Obviously the more mature fitness markets, being Europe and the US and Australia, we’re really starting to see that integration between the wearables that consumers are using into the club basis. But equally, on the other side, areas like Asia, some of the emerging fitness markets, there’s still such great opportunity, but it’s still really, really early days.

Chantal:          Still early days for them. Just so that we have a really thorough understanding, where would you say the industry’s actually come from over the last five years, to where we are today?

Mike:               I think what we have to remember is really the wearable tech industry, arguably, is probably only kind of eight years old. It wasn’t that long ago before, those using wearables had to come back from their run and plug their device back into their computer using a wire, if you remember those things, to upload their workout. So the evolution of things like the smart watches, moving from the counting steps, the 10,000 steps, which became, of course, infamous, has then really evolved through to the smart watches, to the apps, and some really niche areas, actually outside of fitness. Particularly in the medical field, there’s a whole range of development in terms of how wearables can integrate, not only in the fitness element, but also provide some really interesting biometric information and medical, which I think is going to merge with our fitness data, as well.

Chantal:          Well, that pretty much leads us perfectly into my next question, because I’ve heard, as well, a lot about where wearables and medicine, and wearables and fit are progressing to. From your perspective, what do you think that next, let’s say, two to five years looks like, when it comes to wearables?

Mike:               I think a lot of it, you know, the sensors now, in terms of the technology, can really track anything. A lot of those come really from either the medical or the high performance sports field. So really, we can track anything we want to measure. It’s more about finding therefore what is the relevant thing, depending on the kind of activity that you’re doing.

I think secondly, the whole wearable … individual consumer wearable market and integration to fitness, in terms of what we’re doing in clubs, is the other really exciting growth area. So seeing the merge of those two things, but also some really niche devices that are coming out now, based on specifically … There’s a device now, if you’re boxing, that goes into a glove, to be able to tell you the speed and power of your punches and how fast, so we’re also seeing some real niche wearables coming out that are very specific to certain kinds of activity.

Chantal:          We’ve obviously touched on the past and the present and the future of wearable tech, but one of the areas that I wanted to explore with you was specifically how club owners integrate this type of technology. So from your perspective, what would you say some of the biggest advantages are for a club owner to actually introduce wearable tech into their club?

Mike:               Yeah, well, with the continued growth, particularly as more and more millennials start coming in and training at our clubs, this is only going to continue to grow. If we look at the business we’re in, really, is motivation. We all know, in every club, whatever product we offer, however good the trainers are, there are members that don’t make it, because they don’t maintain that motivation enough or until they start to see the results. The whole wearable concept is really built around gamification and motivating. So as a club operator, by being able to build on some of those principles and using the tapping into that power of wearables, then of course you can drive retention, you can drive member engagement. So, yeah, there’s a number of different return on investment models if you can tap into that.

Chantal:          You know, I always feel that sometimes as fitness professionals, when you’re in the shoes of being an owner or a manager or a personal trainer, because we love exercise, sometimes it’s easy to forget that not everyone loves exercise in the way that we do, so there is a need to have that extra element to actually help motivate people, and to entice people to come back and to train more, and to train more often, and to train for longer. That’s exactly what we’re talking about. This is exactly what those wearables can do. So I always feel like one of the best ways to truly to understand any type of product or technology or service is through case studies. Are there any case studies, or is there any research or statistics that you can share with us, perhaps from Myzone, on the effects that wearables have on, say, member retention?

Mike:               Yes, there’s a number of ways that you can look at the impact of wearables on member behaviour. So again, they’re all about behaviour change. So, of course, the holy grail really is retention, so there are a number of quite big studies that have looked at that. One particular study, one of the larger ones, was the Village group, a chain of gyms in the UK. They looked at … shared the data of over 8,000 members. They specifically looked and compared the members that are using Myzone and those that are not using Myzone, and they showed a fairly significant 30% difference in the average length of stay, so it proved that there was a markable difference between those that were and were not using wearables. That figure’s actually been fairly consistent across a whole number of different operators across different sizes, so it shows the impact that it can have on the bottom line in terms of retention.

Chantal:          That’s a massive impact. You know, you mentioned just earlier the word gamification, and I don’t want to gloss over this, because I think it’s such an important factor, and one that, yes, I know a lot of people understand, but at the same time, I think that it’s important that everyone understands the term gamification, so can you explain exactly what that word means? What does gamification mean in relation to wearables, specifically?

Mike:               Sure. Gamification as a concept applies things like points and levels, and basically turns anything into a game. I like the quote I heard once, that gamification is exciting because it promises to make the hard stuff in life fun. As you mentioned before, we forget, I think, that for a lot of members, exercise actually isn’t that fun. It’s still a chore. It’s something they know they should do, they come along and they do their workout, so if we can make that a fun exercise, to make it habitual, that they want to come back and do it again, and that’s really what gamification does.

So the idea is you track what you do, so you get points or you get levels, and of course, once you’re in a game, there’s always the next level that you want to aspire to. The idea as an operator is then to be able to recognise and reward that, so in the same way that frequent flier programmes, where you can aspire to get to the next level and there’s a whole range of other benefits, and of course you then aspire to keep going, and the game never ends.

Chantal:          Are there any examples that you could share with us on how a fitness facility has used gamification to actually increase their member adherence?

Mike:               You can actually apply gamification in a whole number of different ways. It can be as simple as, during a class, using live feedback in terms of points, just to see how you’re competing against someone else. So some of the operators that integrate the live feedback into their workout, Coaching Zone is a good example that use that kind of programme, so you’ve got that short term gamification of who’s going to get the most points in the workout, but then in the longer term, things like challenges, of course, we know that challenge is a really powerful aspect of gamification, and having that live leader board.

Chantal:          So anyone that doesn’t know Coaching Zone, can you just explain that to us?

Mike:               Yeah, so Coaching Zone is a brand from Belgravia Health and Leisure Group, so they’re box in a box boutiques, but some of them are then Genesis clubs and others now are standalone, so they looked to create this kind of boutique model and they wanted to create a unique experience. What they’ve done is therefore develop programing, all based on the live heart rate and using that during the actual sessions. So it means that it has the big screen and that’s motivational, and the coaches can really use that to engage the members during those sessions.

Chantal:          Mike, I’m not sure if you caught the interview that I did with Lauren Foundos recently, from Forte, and for anyone that hasn’t yet listened to that interview, Forte is a business that provides live class streaming to club owners, and I was asking her the question about what her thoughts were on the integration between live class streaming, virtual classes, and wearable tech, and from her perspective, she was saying it’s still an area that they’re working on. Do you have any thoughts on that topic, or any experience in that area?

Mike:               Yeah, so integration, obviously a really key aspect for any technology. So within our own platform, we have our own virtual classes with the wearable integration, but also we do it with other partners. Something fairly recent, that we haven’t yet announced, is that Fitness on Demand have now integrated the Myzone system, which allows you to run the Fitness on Demand system with heart rate showing on the screen. So integration, bringing different technologies together, is going to be a key, moving forward. That’s one of a few partnerships that I think will be really exciting.

Chantal:          That’s amazing. I’m going to assume that most people know Fitness on Demand, but for anyone that doesn’t, they provide virtual classes. So what I’m imagining right now is a screen in a studio, with, say, the instructor is on the screen doing a strength based training class, for example, and what you’re saying is there will be an overlay of Myzone coloured tiles that sits on top of that.

Mike:               Yes, exactly right. Yeah, so previously they’ve been often operated as separate systems with some operators, and it just integrates the fact that they, once they have hardware, they can then deliver the same solution. The driver for us integrating our own virtual class platform was that operators are really interested in this whole growth in technology and virtual was certainly one of those places. So in speaking to operators, looking at heart rate and looking at virtual, that was the driver for us, to say, well, actually we can provide that integrated solution so you have your Myzone virtual and the heart rate showing, and it provides that two-way feedback, which I think is the one thing, as a layer on top of a virtual class that you watch, to have your own heart rate live feed coming through the same screen really gives you more of an interactive environment than just watching a video. I think it adds a whole new element.

Chantal:          Incredible motivation. So, Mike, we’ve covered quite a bit of ground here today, talking about wearable tech. Are there any final takeaways that you would leave everyone with today?

Mike:               I guess the first thing for operators looking at adopting wearable technology, and obviously we talk to a lot of them, I think one of the concerns is just to reassure people they don’t need to be a techie. We talk to operators who say, “I’m not really very good with this stuff.” The whole idea of technology is to try and simplify the process, so you don’t have to be a techie to be able to adopt technology into your club.

That said, what is important to get the best return in investment, is those operators that do the best with introducing wearables do it when they integrate it to their strategy, they introduce it their classes, to their programing, to their rewards points. So equally, it’s not a set and forget. It is something that you want to get maximum benefit from, and that’s why there are deployment plans and playbooks that will help you step through how you go through that process, to bring something like Myzone into your club successfully.

Chantal:          That is great. Well, look, thank you so much for joining us today in a rather unusual setting. But, no, I really do appreciate getting those insights from you and having a look at the history of wearables and where they’re headed to. I always feel, whenever I talk about this topic or anything that is virtual or live class streaming, I’m excited for where the industry is going, because it feels as though we are still … It’s still only early days, and every single week, and every single month, there’s some new development or new progress within the industry of where we’re headed to. So thank you for taking the time to chat to me today, Mike.

Mike:               That’s great. Thanks, Chantal.

Chantal:          Thank you again to Mike for such a detailed and informative interview today. A reminder that Myzone is a wearable technology platform that leverages personal goal setting, gamification, and social platforms to motivate your members. Now, for more information, you can do two things; head directly to Myzone.org, plus there is a great video that I really encourage you to check out, that is located at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com on our partners page. I chat to the President of Myzone, Emmett Williams, and he gives you a great overview all about Myzone. And here’s a little hint; if you want your very own Myzone belt, then I suggest you watch the video right to the end.

Before we finish off today, a reminder that all the resources, the links, and a transcript for today’s show can be found at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com. Thank you so much to our foundation partner, Active Management. If there’s a hole in your lead bucket, you’d fix it. Our founding partner, Active Management, will help you plug the hole in your online lead generating channel with a free download at fitnessbusinesspodcast.com/active.

Thank you all for joining me for another week of the show. I will see you next week, and remember, what you leave behind is not what’s engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.

 

Active Management Members receive monthly tools to make your life as a fitness business owner, manager or team members easier.  Become a member today at www.ActiveMgmt.com.a/joinnow

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